Índice NAO (Oscilación del Atlántico Norte).

Desconectado metragirta

  • Cumulus Congestus
  • ***
  • 889
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Nueva imagen: ya era hora de hacerme un lifting
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #12 en: Miércoles 21 Mayo 2008 16:09:12 pm »

UNA AMPLIACIÓN POR PARTE DE UNO DE LOS AUTORES

Spatial Pattern and Mechanism of Heat Content Change in the North Atlantic

Parts of the Earth’s climate system are clearly changing through anthropogenic forcing: a rise in surface and atmospheric temperatures, a rise in sea level, the decline in summer sea ice in the Arctic and the reduction in many glaciers are all clearly documented by the IPCC report.


(Coauthor: Richard Williams)


However, climate scientists have long understood that climate variability can be attributed not only to human influence, but also to natural variability.  For instance, the El Niño/La Niña cycle in the Pacific is attributed to the natural variability of the ocean and atmosphere.  As the Pacific climate shifts between an El Niño and La Niña state, rainfall patterns, air temperatures and winds over a wide swath of the globe are affected.


Ocean temperatures also change with the cycling of the El Niño/La Niña system.  Currently, the Pacific is in a La Niña state and the temperatures of the surface waters of the eastern Pacific are anomalously cool; that is they are cooler than the climatological average.  During an El Niña state, these temperatures are anomalously warm. 


The Pacific basin does not hold a monopoly on natural climate variability.  In the North Atlantic, scientists have noted changes in the large scale wind patterns over the course of decades and have termed these changes the North Atlantic Oscillation.  Our recent study in Science focuses on the effect of these atmospheric wind changes on the underlying ocean temperatures.  Our study was conducted in two parts:  an analysis of historical hydrographic data that has been collected by ships over the past fifty years and an analysis of output from model simulations of the North Atlantic Ocean.


Our data analysis involved comparing temperature data over the full depth of the water column over the last 50 years: 65000 stations in the period 1950-1970 and 98000 stations in the period 1980-2000.  The overall heat content change was found from the difference in the heat stored for each period.  We found, in general agreement with past studies, that the heat stored in the North Atlantic Ocean has changed between 1950-1970 to 1980-2000, with a gain of heat in the latter period. 
 

While a gain of heat is expected from anthropogenic forcing, the pattern of this gain in heat is more complex than initially expected:  heat was gained in the tropics and mid-latitudes, but heat was lost at higher latitudes.  In other words, over the fifty years from 1950 to 2000, some parts of the North Atlantic had warmed, other parts had cooled.  These regional changes are much larger than the background average change, which led us to suspect that the ocean was responding to more than just anthropogenic warming. 


To aid our interpretation of the ocean data, we conducted circulation model experiments driven by realistic surface air-sea fluxes and winds for each period. These experiments revealed that much of the heat content changes over the North Atlantic were associated with a wind-induced redistribution of heat together with a background input of heat in the tropics. This wind-induced change has altered over the last 40 years, associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, which alters on interannual and decadal timescales.  Thus, though some parts of the climate system are certainly changing through anthropogenic forcing, the North Atlantic changes in heat content show a more complicated response than expected, a response that we believe is largely driven by natural variability.  While our study results do not preclude the influence of anthropogenic warming on the North Atlantic heat content changes, it appears that decadal variability in the North Atlantic is strong enough, at present, to mask any background warming trend.


Our research is not intended to be a referendum as to whether greenhouse warming is happening, since anthropogenic warming is almost certainly occurring given the wide range of global signals showing change.  Rather, our work provides a cautionary note for the investigation and interpretation of climate signals in the ocean.  Our work also highlights the need for long-term monitoring of the ocean’s temperature field.  Only with such monitoring will oceanographers be able to unravel the influence of anthropogenic forcing and natural variability on the ocean’s temperatures.


Por otra parte, sobre si la NAO depende o no del calentamiento global. Prece que siguen cursos diferentes:

"No soy escéptico porque no quiera creer, sino porque quiero saber" ~Michael Shermer~
Javier.
ACANMET
AVCAN

Desconectado barrufa.

  • Cumulus Húmilis
  • **
  • 467
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • La nieve es mi pasión!
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #13 en: Miércoles 21 Mayo 2008 16:16:58 pm »
Muy Interesante!

 Pero Me parece sintomatico el miedo que tienen con estas coletillas de que bajemos la guardia...  ::) o los catalogemos de poco rigurosos en la meta de frenar el calentamiento :o

Citar
Our research is not intended to be a referendum as to whether greenhouse warming is happening, since anthropogenic warming is almost certainly occurring given the wide range of global signals showing change.  Rather, our work provides a cautionary note for the investigation and interpretation of climate signals in the ocean.  Our work also highlights the need for long-term monitoring of the ocean’s temperature field.  Only with such monitoring will oceanographers be able to unravel the influence of anthropogenic forcing and natural variability on the ocean’s temperatures.[/color]




UNA AMPLIACIÓN POR PARTE DE UNO DE LOS AUTORES

Spatial Pattern and Mechanism of Heat Content Change in the North Atlantic

Parts of the Earth’s climate system are clearly changing through anthropogenic forcing: a rise in surface and atmospheric temperatures, a rise in sea level, the decline in summer sea ice in the Arctic and the reduction in many glaciers are all clearly documented by the IPCC report.


(Coauthor: Richard Williams)


However, climate scientists have long understood that climate variability can be attributed not only to human influence, but also to natural variability.  For instance, the El Niño/La Niña cycle in the Pacific is attributed to the natural variability of the ocean and atmosphere.  As the Pacific climate shifts between an El Niño and La Niña state, rainfall patterns, air temperatures and winds over a wide swath of the globe are affected.


Ocean temperatures also change with the cycling of the El Niño/La Niña system.  Currently, the Pacific is in a La Niña state and the temperatures of the surface waters of the eastern Pacific are anomalously cool; that is they are cooler than the climatological average.  During an El Niña state, these temperatures are anomalously warm. 


The Pacific basin does not hold a monopoly on natural climate variability.  In the North Atlantic, scientists have noted changes in the large scale wind patterns over the course of decades and have termed these changes the North Atlantic Oscillation.  Our recent study in Science focuses on the effect of these atmospheric wind changes on the underlying ocean temperatures.  Our study was conducted in two parts:  an analysis of historical hydrographic data that has been collected by ships over the past fifty years and an analysis of output from model simulations of the North Atlantic Ocean.


Our data analysis involved comparing temperature data over the full depth of the water column over the last 50 years: 65000 stations in the period 1950-1970 and 98000 stations in the period 1980-2000.  The overall heat content change was found from the difference in the heat stored for each period.  We found, in general agreement with past studies, that the heat stored in the North Atlantic Ocean has changed between 1950-1970 to 1980-2000, with a gain of heat in the latter period. 
 

While a gain of heat is expected from anthropogenic forcing, the pattern of this gain in heat is more complex than initially expected:  heat was gained in the tropics and mid-latitudes, but heat was lost at higher latitudes.  In other words, over the fifty years from 1950 to 2000, some parts of the North Atlantic had warmed, other parts had cooled.  These regional changes are much larger than the background average change, which led us to suspect that the ocean was responding to more than just anthropogenic warming. 


To aid our interpretation of the ocean data, we conducted circulation model experiments driven by realistic surface air-sea fluxes and winds for each period. These experiments revealed that much of the heat content changes over the North Atlantic were associated with a wind-induced redistribution of heat together with a background input of heat in the tropics. This wind-induced change has altered over the last 40 years, associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, which alters on interannual and decadal timescales.  Thus, though some parts of the climate system are certainly changing through anthropogenic forcing, the North Atlantic changes in heat content show a more complicated response than expected, a response that we believe is largely driven by natural variability.  While our study results do not preclude the influence of anthropogenic warming on the North Atlantic heat content changes, it appears that decadal variability in the North Atlantic is strong enough, at present, to mask any background warming trend.


Our research is not intended to be a referendum as to whether greenhouse warming is happening, since anthropogenic warming is almost certainly occurring given the wide range of global signals showing change.  Rather, our work provides a cautionary note for the investigation and interpretation of climate signals in the ocean.  Our work also highlights the need for long-term monitoring of the ocean’s temperature field.  Only with such monitoring will oceanographers be able to unravel the influence of anthropogenic forcing and natural variability on the ocean’s temperatures.


Por otra parte, sobre si la NAO depende o no del calentamiento global. Prece que siguen cursos diferentes:


Amo las depresiones, odio los anticiclones y me gusta el tiempo pues no entiende de política!

Desconectado metragirta

  • Cumulus Congestus
  • ***
  • 889
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Nueva imagen: ya era hora de hacerme un lifting
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #14 en: Miércoles 21 Mayo 2008 17:28:41 pm »
pués eso... ¿que es lo que se sabe del índice?

¿los decisivos patrones NAO, y por conexión AOs, son subestimados en sus mecanismos o realmente su estudio es ya maduro para darles su justa importancia?  ::)



En el 4º iforme del IPCC se mencionan, pero su posible influencia en el contenido de calor del Atlántico es totalmente subestimado, ya que aunque se reconoce exactamente lo que dice el estudio que has dejado, se atribuye finalmente al calentamiento global.

Por eso, cuando veo esos mapas de desertificación para España en el siglo XXI por obra del calentamiento global, que no por el más que deficiente uso del agua y del suelo, me entran ganas de reirme: ya vemos que la NAO lleva un discurrir diferente al de el calentamiento global y este ínidice es el el principal patrón de referencia para las precipitaciones en amplias zonas de la Península y Canarias. La posición actual, y la de décadas anteriores, del Anticiclón de Las Azores está íntimamente relacionada con la evolución de la NAO. En unos años veremos su fase negativa y en que queda la expansión del cinturón tropical por el calentamiento global. Es aventurar algo que está por ver, pero pienso que algunos se tendrán que apretar el famosos cinturón, opinión muy personal, dicho sea de paso.   
"No soy escéptico porque no quiera creer, sino porque quiero saber" ~Michael Shermer~
Javier.
ACANMET
AVCAN

Desconectado barrufa.

  • Cumulus Húmilis
  • **
  • 467
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • La nieve es mi pasión!
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #15 en: Miércoles 21 Mayo 2008 17:39:29 pm »
En mi humilde opinión suscribo lo que dices sobre la NAO el A de las Azores y los escenarios futuros de los mapas de desertización.


pués eso... ¿que es lo que se sabe del índice?

¿los decisivos patrones NAO, y por conexión AOs, son subestimados en sus mecanismos o realmente su estudio es ya maduro para darles su justa importancia?  ::)



En el 4º iforme del IPCC se mencionan, pero su posible influencia en el contenido de calor del Atlántico es totalmente subestimado, ya que aunque se reconoce exactamente lo que dice el estudio que has dejado, se atribuye finalmente al calentamiento global.

Por eso, cuando veo esos mapas de desertificación para España en el siglo XXI por obra del calentamiento global, que no por el más que deficiente uso del agua y del suelo, me entran ganas de reirme: ya vemos que la NAO lleva un discurrir diferente al de el calentamiento global y este ínidice es el el principal patrón de referencia para las precipitaciones en amplias zonas de la Península y Canarias. La posición actual, y la de décadas anteriores, del Anticiclón de Las Azores está íntimamente relacionada con la evolución de la NAO. En unos años veremos su fase negativa y en que queda la expansión del cinturón tropical por el calentamiento global. Es aventurar algo que está por ver, pero pienso que algunos se tendrán que apretar el famosos cinturón, opinión muy personal, dicho sea de paso.   
Amo las depresiones, odio los anticiclones y me gusta el tiempo pues no entiende de política!

Desconectado barrufa.

  • Cumulus Húmilis
  • **
  • 467
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • La nieve es mi pasión!
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #16 en: Jueves 05 Junio 2008 16:10:35 pm »
Según los expertos la correlación entre el índice NAO y las precipitaciones en España es negativa,en el caso concreto de Cataluña(donde yo vivo) mas aun,vamos que en estas tierras no afecta significativamente una NAO negativa o positiva a la hora de que llueva mas o menos y otro tanto se puede decir del AO,primo del NAO pero mas sensible.

la pregunta seria.. ¿si la correlación entre la NAO y lluvias en nuestro país es negativa ,como es que ha coincidido unas lluvias extraordinarias,este Mayo,con un índice NAO en negativo desde Abril sin Excepción?

¿que pensáis? :confused:
Amo las depresiones, odio los anticiclones y me gusta el tiempo pues no entiende de política!

Desconectado JUANJESUS

  • NO AL CREACIONISMO. NO NO Y NO..!!!
  • Nubecilla
  • *
  • 84
  • Sexo: Masculino
    • timonmate
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #17 en: Jueves 05 Junio 2008 18:50:52 pm »
Según los expertos la correlación entre el índice NAO y las precipitaciones en España es negativa,en el caso concreto de Cataluña(donde yo vivo) mas aun,vamos que en estas tierras no afecta significativamente una NAO negativa o positiva a la hora de que llueva mas o menos y otro tanto se puede decir del AO,primo del NAO pero mas sensible.

la pregunta seria.. ¿si la correlación entre la NAO y lluvias en nuestro país es negativa ,como es que ha coincidido unas lluvias extraordinarias,este Mayo,con un índice NAO en negativo desde Abril sin Excepción?

¿que pensáis? :confused:

No se cual es tu fuente cuando afirmas que los expertos comentan que una NAO- implica pocas lluvias por estos lares. ¡¡Es al contrario!!

Cuando la Oscilación del Atlántico Norte (NAO) es negativa, es decir, el anticiclón de las Azores y la Borrasca Islandesa están ambos de capa caida, en la Europa del Sur, incluso en el norte de África, llueve mucho más en el el caso contrario (NAO positiva).

LLevamos una racha de NAO- y ya ves que semanas tan bien regaditas.


Con NAO+ en España, salvo en las costas cantábricas, no nos comemos nada del pastel. Todo se lo quedan en latitudes algo superiores a la nuestra, con esos vientos perennes del oeste.
« Última modificación: Jueves 05 Junio 2008 18:54:45 pm por JUANJESUS »
León, a 835 m sobre el nivel del mar.


http://perso.wanadoo.es/timonmate/

Desconectado barrufa.

  • Cumulus Húmilis
  • **
  • 467
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • La nieve es mi pasión!
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #18 en: Viernes 06 Junio 2008 11:40:35 am »
No me he explicado correctamente..
Yo me refiero a que según los mas prestigiosos estudios la correlación entre la NAO y las precipitaciones es muy irregular en la Península,por ejemplo la mejor correlación se da en invierno que es según los estudios cuando mas afecta una NAO negativa y la peor correlación se da en verano,además dependiendo de la zona la correlación es poca o no existe,como por ejemplo en el mediterráneo y en parte del sur de España,yo no lo veo muy claro pues creo que una NAO negativa incluso en Cataluña lugar donde vivo y Pirineos en concreto si que creo que tiene una relación mas acusada a diferencia de lo que piensan los estudios realizados como el de Javier Martín Vide,pongo enlace.

(lo recomiendo,con gráficos de precipitación)
EL INDICE NAO Y LA PRECIPITACIÓN MENSUAL EN LA ESPAÑA PENINSULAR
http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/SirveObras/12604530802376064198846/catalogo26/02inve26.pdf

Según los expertos la correlación entre el índice NAO y las precipitaciones en España es negativa,en el caso concreto de Cataluña(donde yo vivo) mas aun,vamos que en estas tierras no afecta significativamente una NAO negativa o positiva a la hora de que llueva mas o menos y otro tanto se puede decir del AO,primo del NAO pero mas sensible.

la pregunta seria.. ¿si la correlación entre la NAO y lluvias en nuestro país es negativa ,como es que ha coincidido unas lluvias extraordinarias,este Mayo,con un índice NAO en negativo desde Abril sin Excepción?

¿que pensáis? :confused:

No se cual es tu fuente cuando afirmas que los expertos comentan que una NAO- implica pocas lluvias por estos lares. ¡¡Es al contrario!!

Cuando la Oscilación del Atlántico Norte (NAO) es negativa, es decir, el anticiclón de las Azores y la Borrasca Islandesa están ambos de capa caida, en la Europa del Sur, incluso en el norte de África, llueve mucho más en el el caso contrario (NAO positiva).

LLevamos una racha de NAO- y ya ves que semanas tan bien regaditas.


Con NAO+ en España, salvo en las costas cantábricas, no nos comemos nada del pastel. Todo se lo quedan en latitudes algo superiores a la nuestra, con esos vientos perennes del oeste.
Amo las depresiones, odio los anticiclones y me gusta el tiempo pues no entiende de política!

Desconectado metragirta

  • Cumulus Congestus
  • ***
  • 889
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Nueva imagen: ya era hora de hacerme un lifting
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #19 en: Viernes 06 Junio 2008 16:28:54 pm »
Bueno Barrufa. En el caso de la fachada mediterránea no podemos fijarnos únicamente en una teleconexión. El estudio de Martín Vidé no es un hecho aislado, hay muchos parecidos que se empecinan en dar datos similares de influencia de la NAO en esa zona. Y es que el clima es muy complejo y en este caso podrían influir más otras teleconexiones que la NAO, sin obviar que una NAOi negativa es generosa con casi todo el mediterráneo, por el patrón de circulación general que provoca.

Me refiero al MOI (Mediterranean Oscillation Index) o al WeMO. De ésta última te dejo un enlace del propio Martí-Vide:

http://www.ub.es/gc/English/wemo.htm

Y también una tesis doctoral de López Bustins, Joan Albert

http://www.tesisenxarxa.net/TDX-0228108-121721/
« Última modificación: Viernes 06 Junio 2008 16:31:06 pm por metragirta »
"No soy escéptico porque no quiera creer, sino porque quiero saber" ~Michael Shermer~
Javier.
ACANMET
AVCAN

Desconectado barrufa.

  • Cumulus Húmilis
  • **
  • 467
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • La nieve es mi pasión!
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #20 en: Viernes 06 Junio 2008 19:01:11 pm »
Bueno Barrufa. En el caso de la fachada mediterránea no podemos fijarnos únicamente en una teleconexión. El estudio de Martín Vidé no es un hecho aislado, hay muchos parecidos que se empecinan en dar datos similares de influencia de la NAO en esa zona. Y es que el clima es muy complejo y en este caso podrían influir más otras teleconexiones que la NAO, sin obviar que una NAOi negativa es generosa con casi todo el mediterráneo, por el patrón de circulación general que provoca.

Me refiero al MOI (Mediterranean Oscillation Index) o al WeMO. De ésta última te dejo un enlace del propio Martí-Vide:



http://www.ub.es/gc/English/wemo.htm

Y también una tesis doctoral de López Bustins, Joan Albert

http://www.tesisenxarxa.net/TDX-0228108-121721/


Gracias metragirta!
Me lo mirare este fin de semana,pues es un tema que me interesa mucho.
 :)
Amo las depresiones, odio los anticiclones y me gusta el tiempo pues no entiende de política!

Desconectado NeBeL

  • Nebel el viejo
  • Supercélula
  • ******
  • 7158
  • Hay mucha tontería en el mundo
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #21 en: Martes 10 Junio 2008 08:55:18 am »

Y no te resulta curioso que ahora parece que se pongan la AMO el PDO y la NAO todas en nueva configuración..incluso el minimo solar ::),vamos que de golpe han dicho vamos a enfriar el planeta..

pués eso... ¿que es lo que se sabe del índice?


la verdad es que estos índices artificiales tipo NAO que tenemos como referencias siempre me han intrigado en sus vaivenes. En el estudio que linko, publicado este enero pasado en Science Express , nos comentaban como veian el tema, y en su apartado resumen, para resumir  ;D, contaban esto:


“Lastly, the positive trend in the winter NAO index in the 1990s has been attributed to anthropogenic forcing (Hurrell 1995), implying that the NAO could be the route by which anthropogenic warming is imprinted on the ocean. However, although most climate models show a slight strengthening of the NAO index with anthropogenic forcing, the climate models also underestimate the strength of the recent decadal trend in the NAO, raising doubts as to the viability of the connection between the NAO and anthropogenic forcing in climate models (Gillett et al. 2003; Stephenson et al. 2006). Hence, although the change in ocean heat content over the North Atlantic can be connected to the decadal trend in the NAO, it is premature to conclusively attribute these regional patterns of heat gain to greenhouse warming. Continued long-term monitoring of North Atlantic temperatures is needed to answer the question of whether the basin-average warming is reflecting anthropogenic forcing and/or natural variability.


en el abstracto inicial aputaban:

"Whether the overall heat gain is due to anthropogenic warming is difficult to confirm because strong natural variability in this ocean basin is potentially masking such input at the present time"


¿los decisivos patrones NAO, y por conexión AOs, son subestimados en sus mecanismos o realmente su estudio es ya maduro para darles su justa importancia?  ::)


The Spatial Pattern and Mechanisms of Heat-Content Change in the North Atlantic




Yo me imagino que el mínimo solar tiene una cierta inercia, así que si estamos ahora con el mínimo, los efectos fríos (si los tiene) se manifestarán dentro de algún año, y durarán algunos más.

Saludos.
Valencia, zona Este.


Desconectado Roberto-Iruña

  • Supercélula
  • ******
  • 5101
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Nunca llueve a gusto de todos.
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #22 en: Viernes 08 Agosto 2008 16:34:48 pm »
Hola a todos, retomo el tópic porque el tema de las teleconexiones me parece interesante: tengo una dudilla acerca de la ecuacíón del índice NAO; ¿Qué periodo de años se toma cómo referencia para conocer cual es la diferencia de presión media entre el anticiclón de las Azores y la baja de Islandia? ¿Los ciclos de NAO positivas y negativas qué regularidad siguen, o no siguen ninguna regularidad y es imposible prever el próximo mes que NAO habrá?
« Última modificación: Miércoles 13 Agosto 2008 12:59:59 pm por roberto de pamplona »

Desconectado tro

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1456
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Que sais-je? ( M.d.M.)
    • Amazing snow
Re: Sabeis algo del índice NAO(Oscilación del atlántico norte)?
« Respuesta #23 en: Sábado 04 Octubre 2008 11:42:41 am »
Hablando de la NAO, expongo este reciente artículo, que bien podria ir en distintos tópics. Me decido por este.


El caso es que según últimos estudios, el quid de la cuestión de deshielos en glaciares groenlandeses apuntaria a calentones de las aguas oceánicas, en forma de repercusiones NAO para ser exactos.



David Holland, director of the Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, part of New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, suggests that ocean temperatures may be more important for glacier flow than previously thought.
  :sonrisa:



"These data indicate a striking, substantial jump in bottom temperature in all parts in the survey area during the second half of the 1990s. In particular, they show that a warm water pulse arrived suddenly on the continental shelf on Disko Bay, which is in close proximity Jakobshavn Isbræ, in 1997. The arrival coincided precisely with the rapid thinning and subsequent retreat of Jakobshavn Isbræ. The warm water mass remains today, and Jakobshavn Isbræ is still in a state of rapid retreat."




The remaining question, then, is what caused the rise in water temperatures during this period.


 ::) ::) ::)



al parecer, dando por sentado pués que el origen está en las aguas, con todo las consecuencias térmicas que eso conlleva, el tema imprtante es la conexión atmosfera-oceános y los cambios asociados en las circulaciones debido a esta/s conexión/nes.



"... Since the mid-1990s, observations show a warming of the subpolar gyre and the northern Irminger Basin, which lies south of Greenland. The researchers attributed this warming to changes in the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)"


... they noted a major change in the behavior of the NAO during the winter of 1995?, which weakened the subpolar gyre, allowing warm subpolar waters to spread westward, beneath colder surface polar waters, and consequently on and over the west Greenland continental shelf.




Holland sugiere que los cambios en la NAO, las respuestas de las dinámicas oceánicas, tienen, "posiblemente", su motor el las influencias antropogénicas.


... pero esto (si bien posible) es algo dificil de demostrar, muy dificil.


Researchers attribute thinning of Greenland glacier to ocean warming preceded by atmospheric changes
« Última modificación: Sábado 04 Octubre 2008 12:48:30 pm por tro »
https://twitter.com/tromarqui



                                        “la ciencia es la religión de los barrios residenciales” (William Butler Yeats)