Observaciones vs modelos

Desconectado Patagon

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1022
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #60 en: Jueves 27 Octubre 2011 09:58:13 am »
Una gráfica del albedo global, medido por CERES y ERBE y modelado por los diferentes GCM.  Hay diferencias abismales tanto entre los satélites como entre los satélites y los GCM.  Diferencias que deberían considerarse como márgenes de error en la incertidumbre de las proyecciones climáticas y que suponen una cantidad entre 6 y 9 veces superior a lo que normalmente se acepta como forzamiento radiativo antropogénico:   
 13.64 W/m2 vs 1.5 ± 0.5 W/m2


 
fuente:
22 views of the global albedo—comparison between 20 GCMs and two satellites
Frida A-M. Bender, Henning Rodhe1, Robert J. Charlson, Annica M.L. Ekman and Norman Loeb
Tellus (2006), 58A, 320–330
 

Desconectado vigilant

  • Bob està sempre ocupat :p
  • Supercélula Tornádica
  • *******
  • 16520
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Mahmoud Asgani y Ayaz Marhoni, en mi memoria
    • Meteorologia i física teòrica
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #61 en: Jueves 27 Octubre 2011 19:38:00 pm »
Vigilant, gracias por recordarnos in extensis las clases de BUP o de primero. Un error sistematico de 3 K cuando se pretende detectar una variacion de .02 a .06 no me parece aceptable. Insisto en que algo falla en el EB
----
Los tropicos son el meollo de cuestion busca por ahi "hot spot"

Claro que es aceptable. Si tu tienes un termómetro que siempre mide 3ºC más que otro que funciona bien, entonces los dos detectarán exáctamente la misma variación de temperatura, tanto el que funciona bien como el que funciona mal. Exáctamente ocurre lo mismo con los modelos, el error sistemático no es ningún problema para detectar cambios.

Saludos

Desconectado Patagon

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1022
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #62 en: Jueves 27 Octubre 2011 19:41:55 pm »
O sea que un modelo es como un termometro.

Me temo que no.


Desconectado vigilant

  • Bob està sempre ocupat :p
  • Supercélula Tornádica
  • *******
  • 16520
  • Sexo: Masculino
  • Mahmoud Asgani y Ayaz Marhoni, en mi memoria
    • Meteorologia i física teòrica
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #63 en: Jueves 27 Octubre 2011 19:45:16 pm »
O sea que un modelo es como un termometro.

Me temo que no.

No, pero el error sistemático sí. El error sistemático es un error constante (o permanente) por definición, por lo que una vez detectado se elimina y punto. Lo importante es el error aleatorio: este nunca debe ser mayor que los cambios que se quieren detectar, sino mal vamos (se invalida cualquier conclusión).

Saludos

Desconectado Patagon

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1022
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #64 en: Viernes 28 Octubre 2011 08:25:17 am »
Que no vigilant, que la teoría y calculo de errores tiene condiciones de aplicación muy estricta, y no es comparable un sensor a un modelo, son cosas completamente diferentes.

Desconectado ArchibaldHaddock

  • Cumulus Húmilis
  • **
  • 465
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #65 en: Viernes 28 Octubre 2011 12:49:55 pm »
IPCC Climate Physicist Verifies Climate Model Predictions Are Worthless For Periods Longer Than A Decade

Climate experts Latif and Keenlyside established the following:

1. "...examples of these internal [climate] variations are "the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), the Pacific Decadal Variability (PDV), and the Atlantic Multidecadal Variability (AMV)," all of which "project on global or hemispheric surface air temperature (SAT)...special attention to the variability of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC), which they suggest is likely the origin of a considerable part of the decadal variability within the Atlantic Sector"

2. "...list numerous problems that hamper decadal climate predictability, among which is the fact that "the models suffer from large biases." In the cases of annual mean sea surface temperature (SST) and SAT over land, for example, they state that "typical errors can amount up to 10°C in certain regions,"..."

3. "...they add that several models also "fail to simulate a realistic El Niño/Southern Oscillation."..."

4. "...they indicate that "several assumptions have generally to be made about the process under consideration that cannot be rigorously justified, and this is a major source of uncertainty.""

5. "Another problem they discuss is the fact that "some components of the climate system are not well represented or not at all part of standard climate models," one example being the models' neglect of the stratosphere. This omission is quite serious, since Latif and Keenlyside say that "recent studies indicate that the mid-latitudinal response to both tropical and extra-tropical SST anomalies over the North Atlantic Sector may critically depend on stratospheric feedbacks," ..."

6. "An additional common model shortcoming, even in stand-alone integrations with models forced by observed SSTs, is that model simulations of rainfall in the Sahel "fail to reproduce the correct magnitude of the decadal precipitation anomalies.""

7. "Still another failure is the fact, as shown by Stroeve et al. (2007), that "virtually all climate models considerably underestimate the observed Arctic sea ice decline during the recent decades in the so-called 20th century integrations with prescribed (known natural and anthropogenic) observed forcing.""

8. "And added to these problems is the fact that "atmospheric chemistry and aerosol processes are still not well incorporated into current climate models.""

9. "...that "they [models] are incomplete and do not incorporate potentially important physics,""

10. "...that "the poor observational database does not allow a distinction between 'realistic' and 'unrealistic' simulations,"..."

11. "...state that "a sufficient understanding of the mechanisms of decadal-to-multidecadal variability is lacking," that "state-of-the-art climate models suffer from large biases,"..."

12. "...Therefore, they conclude that "it cannot be assumed that current climate models are well suited to realize the full decadal predictability potential,"..."

[Mojib Latif, Noel S. Keenlyside 2011: Deep Sea Research Part II: Topical Studies in Oceanography]



Predicting the Course of Climate Change Over the Next Decade

What it means
In summing up their findings, which include those noted above and a whole lot more, Latif and Keenlyside state that "a sufficient understanding of the mechanisms of decadal-to-multidecadal variability is lacking," that "state-of-the-art climate models suffer from large biases," that "they are incomplete and do not incorporate potentially important physics," that various mechanisms "differ strongly from model to model," that "the poor observational database does not allow a distinction between 'realistic' and 'unrealistic' simulations," and that many models "still fail to simulate a realistic El Niño/Southern Oscillation." Therefore, they conclude that "it cannot be assumed that current climate models are well suited to realize the full decadal predictability potential," which is a somewhat-obscure but kinder-and-gentler way of stating that current state-of-the-art climate models are simply not good enough to make reasonably accurate simulations of climate change over a period of time (either in the past or the future) that is measured in mere decades.




¡¡¡Más leña a los modelos!!!
¡¡¡Y en "paper"!!!
« Última modificación: Viernes 28 Octubre 2011 12:52:20 pm por ArchibaldHaddock »

Desconectado Patagon

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1022
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #66 en: Jueves 01 Diciembre 2011 17:05:19 pm »
(no se si hay algun post especifico del nivel del mar?)
 
Mediciones del aumento del nivel del mar

Citar
In 2003 the satellite altimetry record was mysteriously tilted upwards to imply a sudden sea level rise rate of 2.3mm per year. When I criticised this dishonest adjustment at a global warming conference in Moscow, a British member of the IPCC delegation admitted in public the reason for this new calibration: ‘We had to do so, otherwise there would be no trend.’



Nils-Axel  Mörner en
Rising credulity

Nils-Axel Mörner was head of paleogeophysics and geodynamics at Stockholm University (1991-2005), president of the INQUA Commission on Sea Level Changes and Coastal Evolution (1999-2003), leader of the Maldives sea level project (2000-11), chairman of the INTAS project on geomagnetism and climate (1997-2003).
 

Desconectado LightMatter

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1448
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #67 en: Viernes 02 Diciembre 2011 00:17:36 am »
(no se si hay algun post especifico del nivel del mar?)
 

Mediciones del aumento del nivel del mar

Citar
In 2003 the satellite altimetry record was mysteriously tilted upwards to imply a sudden sea level rise rate of 2.3mm per year. When I criticised this dishonest adjustment at a global warming conference in Moscow, a British member of the IPCC delegation admitted in public the reason for this new calibration: ‘We had to do so, otherwise there would be no trend.’



Nils-Axel  Mörner en
Rising credulity

Nils-Axel Mörner was head of paleogeophysics and geodynamics at Stockholm University (1991-2005), president of the INQUA Commission on Sea Level Changes and Coastal Evolution (1999-2003), leader of the Maldives sea level project (2000-11), chairman of the INTAS project on geomagnetism and climate (1997-2003).

La verdad os hará libres......

Los satelites no son los unicos instrumentos que miden el nivel del mar .....
Las mediciones de tidal waves y satelitales se validan una a otra, nos muestra la misma historia , el nivel del mar sigue aumentando.............

   
Representaciones visuales de la subida del nivel del mar

Publicado el 3 de marzo de 2010 por Peter Hogarth
Puesto de invitado por Peter Hogarth

Aunque muchos críticos coinciden en que los niveles globales del mar están subiendo, a pesar de un examen reciente y revisión de las estimaciones de predecir el aumento del nivel del mar. Como se señaló anteriormente, la predicción de aumento del nivel del mar es dura . La Administración Nacional Oceánica y Atmosférica (NOAA) dice claramente: "Para hacer predicciones, necesitamos conocimiento. Para ampliar los conocimientos que necesitamos observaciones ". Sin embargo, una reciente afirmación de las disputas que los actuales niveles del mar están aumentando significativamente . ¿Es posible verificar o refutar esta afirmación mirando a las observaciones y los datos de la comunidad científica relacionada con la medición del nivel del mar?

La respuesta es sí. Medir el nivel del mar es ahora un esfuerzo multidisciplinario que incluye la integración de las observaciones de varias redes mundiales de cientos de estaciones de mareas, calibrado con datos de referencia vertical de GPS cerca (Sistema de Posicionamiento Global, que ahora utilizan el sistema estadounidense GPS, GLONASS ruso y europeo constelaciones de satélites Galileo ) o DORIS (Doppler Integrado por Satélite Orbitografía) estaciones, y los datos de varios altímetros radar por satélite independiente basado en (recientemente Jason I, Jason II, y Envisat), que dará completa cobertura global, los datos sobre la temperatura del mar y la presión de los sensores de ARGO flotante ( que dan información sobre las variaciones de temperatura y la salinidad oceánica relacionados en volumen ), y más recientemente los datos del satélite GRACE sensor basado en la gravedad (de recuperación Gravedad y Experimento Climático), que puede dar mediciones directas de los cambios en la masa de agua oceánica y con base en tierra.

Un análisis realizado en 2009 por Merrifield et al del GLOSS (Sistema Global de Observación del Nivel del Mar) da una idea de la gran cantidad y variedad de organizaciones y trabajadores involucrados. Estas medidas son complementarias, así como ofrecer servicios independientes comprobaciones de validación cruzada en cualquier conjunto de datos individuales, y muchos equipos de forma independiente proceso de observaciones primas para obtener datos del nivel del mar. Esto ha mejorado enormemente nuestros conocimientos de aumento estimado del nivel del mar a nivel mundial y regional durante los últimos 20 años, con mejoras continuas de las estimaciones, así como la reducción de las incertidumbres con respecto al nivel centimétrico a nivel sub-mm.

¿Cuáles son las conclusiones de estos esfuerzos? Revisiones recientes ( Cazenave y otros, 2009 , Cazenave y Llovel 2010 ) muestran que la mayoría hasta la fecha las estimaciones de media de velocidad de subida del nivel del mar para el siglo 20 se reúnen en torno a 1,7 a 1.8mm/year, con la incertidumbre de alrededor de 0,2 a 0,3 mm. ( Ablain 2009 , la Iglesia 2008 , Engelhart 2009 , Jevrejeva 2008 , Leulette 2009 , 2009 Merrifield , Woppelmann 2009 ). Las pequeñas diferencias entre las cifras reportadas se deben principalmente a las diferentes Glacial-isostáticas de ajuste (GIA) o modelo de corrección basado en GPS que se utilizan para las estaciones de marea, y la extrapolación de los conocimientos actuales de estas correcciones velocidad vertical hacia atrás para antes de que el GPS absoluta corrección de datos se disponible.


Figure 3: Global mean sea level from 1870 to 2006 with one standard deviation error estimates (Church 2008).\


Figura 1: Global corregir datos de la estación de marea (Church 2006 actualizado a 2009-azul oscuro, y Jevrejeva 2008 - rojo)

Más recientemente, los datos corregidos de las mareas estación de la época del altímetro de satélite de 1993 a 2010 es un buen acuerdo ( dentro del presupuesto de error ) con los datos del altímetro de satélite, lo que da 3.3mm/year ± 0,4 mm cuando se añaden correcciones GIA. Estos valores se consideran "robusto". El mensaje general es claro. Los niveles del mar están subiendo.


Figura 2: Los datos de los altímetros de satélites y 3 meses promedio compuesto. Las variaciones estacionales se han mantenido (tendencia 2.83mm/year, corrección GIA añadiría otro 0,2 a 0.5mm/yr)

Tanto los datos de la estación de mareas y un altímetro datos muestran variaciones decenales y más corto plazo en la tasa de aumento, pero hay un importante peso de la evidencia de una reciente aceleración de la tasa de aumento del nivel del mar a finales del siglo pasado ( 2008 Jevrejeva , Merrifield 2009 , Vermeer 2009 ), mientras que la "desaceleración", informó por algunos observadores (alrededor de 2008) ha demostrado ser de corta duración (a juzgar por los datos de 2009/2010).

También se ha convertido en posible intento de "cerrar" el presupuesto del nivel del mar, que tiene componentes de la expansión térmica informó de que el volumen de agua debido al aumento en la energía térmica acumulada, y también un componente de aumento de deshielo procedente de fuentes terrestres. Una vez más mejoras y correcciones de los datos recientes de la gracia (con GPS) y ARGO resolver las dificultades anteriores y relativamente reciente, de modo que la suma de estas aportaciones relacionadas con el clima (2,85 ± 0,35 mm por año) es comparable con el nivel del mar, altimetría basada en aumento (3,3 ± 0,4 mm por año) durante el período 1993 a 2007 ( Cazenave 2010 , reportando un consenso de la comunidad Observación de los Océanos).

El uso de estos datos, se estima que alrededor del 30% de la tasa observada de aumento durante el período de tiempo de satélite altímetro es debido a la expansión térmica de los océanos y los resultados del 55% del hielo acumulado tierra de fusión. Existe evidencia de que el hielo de la tierra contribución derretimiento ha aumentado considerablemente en los últimos cinco años.

Los datos de altimetría por satélite también es verdaderamente global en su extensión, permitiendo que las estimaciones de aumento reciente del nivel del mar que se hizo para el mar abierto o zonas no atendidas por los mareógrafos calibrado. La distribución de los aumentos superiores a la media histórica (hasta 10mm/year) en el nivel del mar informado de muchas estaciones de marea, mientras que otras estaciones de la marea constantemente informado de la reducción en el nivel del mar, es verificada por los datos de altimetría, pero una imagen mucho más completa y compleja surge, de los cambios dinámicos del nivel del mar y de las regiones locales de alto y bajo incremento medio del nivel del mar.


Figura 3: Los cambios del nivel del mar entre 1993 y 2008 de TOPEX / Poseidon, Jason-1 y Jason-2 altímetros satelitales. Los océanos son un código de colores para los cambios en el nivel medio del mar. Regiones amarillas y rojas muestran aumento del nivel del mar, mientras que las regiones verdes y azules muestran la caída del nivel del mar. Regiones blancas son datos que faltan en ciertos momentos del año. En promedio, el nivel del mar está aumentando, pero complejas variaciones regionales se superponen en este. Crédito: los productos de datos de Ssalto / Duacs, distribuido por Aviso, con el apoyo del CNES.

La correlación con las variaciones de temperatura superficial del mar y también con Denominación de Origen, NAO, fenómeno de El Niño y La Niña se caracteriza, y la influencia de las corrientes oceánicas ecuatoriales del oeste y otras corrientes y sistemas de viento predominante es también evidente. A primera vista esto confirma y explica, por ejemplo, la discrepancia entre los datos de las estaciones de mareas en la costa occidental y oriental de los Estados Unidos y el hecho de que incluso GIA datos corregidos de Alaska demuestra la reducción de locales en el nivel del mar en gran parte del registro. Esto responde a un punto que muchos observadores como "¿por qué no mi nivel local del mar muestran un aumento?"

La naturaleza dinámica de las variaciones del nivel del mar puede ser mejor visualizado por las animaciones de la secuencia temporal de la I Topex, Jason y Jason II conjuntos de datos globales (NOAA Laboratorio de altimetría por satélite).

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/ChakZuIqi4k&amp;feature=player_embedded" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/ChakZuIqi4k&amp;feature=player_embedded</a>

A continuación se muestra en 3-D variaciones del nivel del mar, con colores que representan la superficie del mar durante el fenómeno de El Niño durante 1997 a 1998 (NASA / Goddard Space Flight Center Studio Visualización Científica).

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/JniS83wKmNk&amp;feature=player_embedded" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/JniS83wKmNk&amp;feature=player_embedded</a>

Estas tasas anuales de aumento del nivel del mar puede parecer pequeño en comparación con las variaciones de marea diaria de hasta 8 m (por ejemplo - Bahía de Fundy) o incluso la altura media de las olas en aguas abiertas (!). Sin embargo, mientras que el aumento constante y acelerado gradualmente desde la época preindustrial de unos 30 cm o de un pie puede parecer manejable, si la tendencia actual de pérdida de masa acelerada de Groenlandia y las tapas de hielo de la Antártida , así como los glaciares del mundo se mantiene, el potencial se eleva el nivel del mar tendrá un impacto significativo sobre la humanidad. El peso de los estudios revisados ​​para esta prueba de aceleración en el aumento del nivel del mar es sólido.
« Última modificación: Viernes 02 Diciembre 2011 00:31:47 am por Doom »

In memoriam: Albert A. Bartlett
aHJpenpvIHNvcyB1biBUUk9MICwgeSB5YSBtZSB0ZW5lcyBsb3MgaHVldm9zIHBvciBlbCBwaXNvLCBwZXJvIGlndWFsIHRlIHF1aWVyby4u
"Hay que tener la mente abierta. Pero no tanto como para que se te caiga el cerebro al suelo."
Dr. Richard Feynman

Desconectado Patagon

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1022
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #68 en: Viernes 02 Diciembre 2011 08:56:51 am »
RESEARCH PAPERS
Sea-Level Acceleration Based on U.S. Tide Gauges and Extensions of Previous Global-Gauge Analyses

J. R. Houston† and R. G. Dean‡

Abstract

Without sea-level acceleration, the 20th-century sea-level trend of 1.7 mm/y would produce a rise of only approximately 0.15 m from 2010 to 2100; therefore, sea-level acceleration is a critical component of projected sea-level rise. To determine this acceleration, we analyze monthly-averaged records for 57 U.S. tide gauges in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) data base that have lengths of 60–156 years. Least-squares quadratic analysis of each of the 57 records are performed to quantify accelerations, and 25 gauge records having data spanning from 1930 to 2010 are analyzed. In both cases we obtain small average sea-level decelerations. To compare these results with worldwide data, we extend the analysis of Douglas (1992) by an additional 25 years and analyze revised data of Church and White (2006) from 1930 to 2007 and also obtain small sea-level decelerations similar to those we obtain from U.S. gauge records.

Journal of Coastal Research: Volume 27, Issue 3: pp. 409 – 417.
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-10-00157.1

†Director Emeritus, Engineer Research and Development Center, Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180, U.S.A.
‡Professor Emeritus, Department of Civil and Coastal Civil Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, U.S.A.
 

"In both cases we obtain small average sea-level decelerations."   

Lo cual quita bastante gravedad al asunto.   Los valores medidos son un 60% menores a los corregidos, lo cual es una clara indicacion de que hay que revisar esas correcciones.
 
« Última modificación: Viernes 02 Diciembre 2011 09:00:39 am por Patagon »

Desconectado LightMatter

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1448
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #69 en: Sábado 03 Diciembre 2011 00:03:12 am »
RESEARCH PAPERS
Sea-Level Acceleration Based on U.S. Tide Gauges and Extensions of Previous Global-Gauge Analyses

J. R. Houston† and R. G. Dean‡

Abstract

Without sea-level acceleration, the 20th-century sea-level trend of 1.7 mm/y would produce a rise of only approximately 0.15 m from 2010 to 2100; therefore, sea-level acceleration is a critical component of projected sea-level rise. To determine this acceleration, we analyze monthly-averaged records for 57 U.S. tide gauges in the Permanent Service for Mean Sea Level (PSMSL) data base that have lengths of 60–156 years. Least-squares quadratic analysis of each of the 57 records are performed to quantify accelerations, and 25 gauge records having data spanning from 1930 to 2010 are analyzed. In both cases we obtain small average sea-level decelerations. To compare these results with worldwide data, we extend the analysis of Douglas (1992) by an additional 25 years and analyze revised data of Church and White (2006) from 1930 to 2007 and also obtain small sea-level decelerations similar to those we obtain from U.S. gauge records.

Journal of Coastal Research: Volume 27, Issue 3: pp. 409 – 417.
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-10-00157.1

†Director Emeritus, Engineer Research and Development Center, Corps of Engineers, 3909 Halls Ferry Road, Vicksburg, MS 39180, U.S.A.
‡Professor Emeritus, Department of Civil and Coastal Civil Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, U.S.A.
 

"In both cases we obtain small average sea-level decelerations."   

Lo cual quita bastante gravedad al asunto.   Los valores medidos son un 60% menores a los corregidos, lo cual es una clara indicacion de que hay que revisar esas correcciones.

Antes de comerte la pildora, deberías preguntarte : porque para el estudio solo utilizaron 57 U.S  records , cuando hay más de 500 alrededor del mundo...?

Has sea level rise accelerated since 1880?

Posted on 7 April 2011 by Tamino
Many thanks to Tamino from Open Mind for allowing SkS to republish his post So What? as the rebuttal to "sea level rise is decelerating".

A paper by Houston & Dean studies 57 tide gauge records from the U.S. (including Hawaii and oceanic territories) and concludes that sea level rise has not accelerated. In fact the authors seem to go out of their way to state that the average result shows deceleration at every opportunity. But there are some big questions about their analysis. Why do they use tide gauge records from just U.S. stations? Why not a global sample? Why use individual tide gauge records when we have perfectly good combinations, from much larger samples, which give a global picture of sea level change and show vastly less noise? Why do they restrict their analysis to either the time span of the individual tide gauge records, or to the period from 1930 to 2009? Why do they repeatedly drone on about “deceleration” when the average of the acceleration rates they measure, even for their extremely limited and restricted sample, isn’t statistically significant?

But the biggest question of all is: what’s the big deal?

Here’s some sea level data, in fact two data sets. One is a global combination of tide gauge records by Domingues et al. (2008, Nature, 453, 1090-1094, doi:10.1038/nature07080). Using around 500 tide gauge records globally, it’s the latest version of the “Church & White” dataset. The other is satellite data:



I averaged the two data sources during their period of overlap, and computed a smoothed version:



This is a global data set, and it’s a worldwide average so its shows vastly less noise than individual tide gauge records. We could even use it to look for acceleration or deceleration in sea level rise. But one thing we should not do is restrict consideration to the quadratic term of a quadratic polynomial fit from 1930 onward. That would be pretty ignorant — maybe even misleading.

As so often happens, one thing to be cautious of is that the noise shows autocorrelation. As Houston & Dean point out, the Church & White data since 1930 are approximately linear, so to get a conservative estimate of the autocorrelation I used the residuals from a linear fit to just the post-1930 data and fit an ARMA(1,1) model.

If we compute the linear trend rate for all possible starting years from 1880 to 1990, up to the present, we get this:



According to this, the recent rate of sea level rise is greater than its average value since 1930. Significantly so (in the statistical sense), even using a conservative estimate of autocorrelation. But the increase itself hasn’t been steady, so the sea level curve hasn’t followed a parabola, most of the increase has been since about 1980. How could Houston & Dean have missed this?

Here’s how: first, they determined the presence or absence of acceleration or deceleration based only on the quadratic term of a quadratic fit. That utterly misses the point. Changes in the rate of sea level rise don’t have to follow a parabola, since 1930 or any time point you care to name. In fact, by all observations and predictions, they have not done so and will not do so.

Second, by using individual tide gauge records, the noise level is so high that you can’t really hope to find acceleration or deceleration of any kind, with any consistency. Not using quadratic fits, and certainly the non-parabolic trend which is present can’t be found in such noisy data sets.

Even so, we can also fit a quadratic (as Houston & Dean did), and estimate the acceleration (which is twice the quadratic coefficient):



Well well … it looks like starting at 1930 is the way to get the minimum “acceleration” by this analysis method. Could that be why Houston & Dean chose 1930 as their starting point?

If we restrict to only the data since 1930, as Houston & Dean did, and fit a quadratic trend, we get this:



Can you tell, just by looking, whether it curves upward or downward? Clearly, the parabolic fit doesn’t show much acceleration or deceleration, if any. We can get a better picture by first subtracting a linear fit, then fitting a parabola to the residuals?



That answers the question: the quadratic fit shows acceleration in the Church & White data. But, when autocorrelation is taken into account, the “acceleration” is not statistically signficant.

But — just because the data don’t follow a parabola, doesn’t mean that sea level hasn’t accelerated. Let’s take those residuals from a linear model, and fit a cubic polynomial instead:



Well well … there seems to be change after all, with both acceleration and deceleration but most recently, acceleration. And by the way, this fit is significant.

And now to the really important part, which is not the math but the physics. Whether sea level showed 20th-century acceleration or not, it’s the century coming up which is of concern. And during this century, we expect acceleration of sea level rise because of physics. Not only will there likely be nonlinear response to thermal expansion of the oceans, when the ice sheets become major contributors to sea level rise, they will dominate the equation. Their impact could be tremendous, it could be sudden, and it could be horrible.

The relatively modest acceleration in sea level so far is not a cause for great concern, but neither is it cause for comfort. The fact is that statistics simply doesn’t enable us to foresee the future beyond a very brief window of time. Even given the observed acceleration, the forecasts we should attend to are not from statistics but from physics.


Thanks Tamino. Worth adding that this latest Church and White data set (with tide gauge data updated to 2010) shows a trend that is close to the altimeter record trend over the entire altimeter period. This should reduce any doubts raised in the paper about the altimetry record. Both records are significantly higher than the 20th century average of around 1.8mm/yr, indicating a recent increase in trend.

In memoriam: Albert A. Bartlett
aHJpenpvIHNvcyB1biBUUk9MICwgeSB5YSBtZSB0ZW5lcyBsb3MgaHVldm9zIHBvciBlbCBwaXNvLCBwZXJvIGlndWFsIHRlIHF1aWVyby4u
"Hay que tener la mente abierta. Pero no tanto como para que se te caiga el cerebro al suelo."
Dr. Richard Feynman

Desconectado ArchibaldHaddock

  • Cumulus Húmilis
  • **
  • 465
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #70 en: Sábado 03 Diciembre 2011 00:17:58 am »
¡Hay que joderse! ¡Ya está bien de tanto CORTA-COPIA-PEGA!

¡Que los demás también podemos hacer lo mismo!

Y te aseguro que te ibas a cansar de leer, Doom...

Desconectado LightMatter

  • Cb Calvus
  • ****
  • 1448
  • Sexo: Masculino
Re:Observaciones vs modelos
« Respuesta #71 en: Sábado 03 Diciembre 2011 00:51:53 am »
¡Hay que joderse! ¡Ya está bien de tanto CORTA-COPIA-PEGA!

¡Que los demás también podemos hacer lo mismo!

Y te aseguro que te ibas a cansar de leer, Doom...

Bien tampoco es para enojarse así , no tengo ningún problema,los que postee a partir de ahora lo puedo escribir yo mismo si eso prefieres, solo que así me parece que queda mas completo, que yo muchas veces suelo olvidarme de algo.... :P

Saludos.....

In memoriam: Albert A. Bartlett
aHJpenpvIHNvcyB1biBUUk9MICwgeSB5YSBtZSB0ZW5lcyBsb3MgaHVldm9zIHBvciBlbCBwaXNvLCBwZXJvIGlndWFsIHRlIHF1aWVyby4u
"Hay que tener la mente abierta. Pero no tanto como para que se te caiga el cerebro al suelo."
Dr. Richard Feynman